ABOUT 2010 ISSUES

Brief Descriptions for Vol. 1, Nos. 1-3 of postmedieval: a journal of medieval cultural studies [2010]

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Volume 1, Issues 1-2: When Did We Become Post/human?

Volume 1, Issues 1-2: When Did We Become Post/human?

Eileen A. Joy (Southern Illinois University Edwardsville) and Craig Dionne (Eastern Michigan Univ.)

This issue is designed as a dialogue with Katherine Hayles’s 1999 book How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics, and features medieval and early modern approaches to the question of the historicity of the post/human as an intellectual, social, cultural, philosophical, and scientific category of thought as well as a state of material reality. The issue also seeks to demonstrate that contemporary discourses on the post/human raise a host of troubling questions relative to issues of embodiment, subjectivity, cognition, sociality, sexuality, spirituality, self-determination, collectivization, expression, representation, well-being, ethics, governance, technology, and the like for which pre- and early modern history and culture provide important resources for critical reflection. The issue features Katherine Hayles, Andy Mousley, and Kate Soper as Respondents.

Issue 1.1-2 (Spring/Summer 2010)

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Volume 1, Issue 3: Critical Exchanges: ‘Bruce Holsinger's The Premodern Condition’ / ‘The State(s) of Early English Studies’

Volume 1, Issue 3: Critical Exchanges: ‘Bruce Holsinger's The Premodern Condition’ / ‘The State(s) of Early English Studies’

This issue features two clusters of essays.

Bruce Holsinger's critically lauded 2005 book The Premodern Condition: Medievalism and the Making of Theory presented an elegant excavation of the medieval influences undergirding the work of some of the most brilliant thinkers of the postwar French intelligentsia, elaborating the 'medievalisms' that are so deeply constitutive of modern theory. In the first critical exchange, Louise D'Arcens, Claire Monagle and Stephanie Trigg, three scholars who work, from various angles, in medievalism and medieval cultural studies, discuss The Premodern Condition, with a response from Bruce Holsinger.

'The State(s) of Early English Studies' forms a series of dispatches from some of the 'fronts' of Old English and Anglo Saxon Studies, asking how we might sketch out some of the futures (with an emphasis on the plural) of an early English studies that is not (and never really was) a realm apart from either later periods within literary-historical studies or from contemporary life and thought. 'The States(s) of Early English Studies' is collaboration with The Heroic Age: A Journal of Early Medieval Northwestern Europe, and the remaining essays in the cluster can be read free online in that journal.

Issue 1.3 (Fall / Winter 2010)